The Pennsylvania State University

School of Visual Arts

Coronal Plane

Coronal Plane

Coronal Plane is the culmination of Millett’s research on the anatomical theater at the University of Padua built in 1594, the oldest surviving anatomy theater in the world. The installation allows viewers to walk into and through a space that evokes physical, emotional, and psychological reactions similar to those experienced in the historic anatomy theater in Padua by audiences of the past. In anatomical terminology, the coronal plane is a vertical plane that divides the body into stomach and back sections. Adopting this approach for dissection, Millett created a partial section of the Paduan anatomy theater, thereby metaphorically “dissecting” the space and exposing the supporting structure within. In plan, the installation recreates a lateral section of the anatomy theater, with the section rotated 90° and placed horizontally at floor level.  The lateral section is extruded to a height of six feet in order for the viewer to physically engage with the installation. By incorporating the concentric tiers of balustrades, the installation directly refers to the architecture of the anatomy theater. In keeping with the historical aesthetic, the balustrades are constructed of wood milled using CNC technology.

6' x 30' x 30'
MDO (medium density overlay), LED lights, inkjet prints mounted on glass
Year Created: 
2018